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Harvey Probber

Vintage Harvey Probber Round Marble Coffee Table

Vintage Harvey Probber Round Marble Coffee Table

Regular price $4,200.00 USD
Regular price Sale price $4,200.00 USD
Sale Sold out

Vintage Harvey Probber Round Marble Coffee Table

Round Harvey Probber coffee or gaming table 1950`s Walnut Top With Travertine Marble Insert Ebonized Wooden Base

Dimensions

24.5″ High, 50″ Diameter

Condition

Very Good Condition

Preparation, Timing and Shipment

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Harvey Probber

Harvey Probber 1922-2003 Innovative designer and successful entrepreneur, Brooklyn-born Harvey Probber transformed the look of American furniture at mid-century. Known for his sleek modern lines and flexible modular units, Probber left an indelible stamp on the living rooms and dens of American families. The furniture he designed and produced for 40 years at his factory, Harvey Probber, Inc., first in New York and later in Fall River, Massachusetts, was elegant, up-to-date and beautifully adapted to the mobile, casual TV lifestyles that emerged in the U.S. during the post-World War II decades. Since Probber’s death in March of 2003, a re-evaluation of his design work and his influence on 20 th_ century style has begun. A self-taught modernist, Probber had virtually no artistic training when, at the age of 16, he designed his first piece—a sofa. “The key to salvation was in bits and pieces of plane geometry,” was how he characterized the source of his early inspirations. And it was those bits and pieces that led him to create the upholstered modular seating units that became a furniture industry phenomenon in the 1940s. Probber’s output, however, included much more, including the elegant sling-back chair displayed by MoMA as well as numerous tables and storage units. Later in his career, Probber turned his attention to office furniture, where his influence was as pervasive as it was in home design. Probber modified the severely functional modernist look by his use of fine fabrics, laminated surfaces and tribal-influenced woven materials. “Functional is not nearly enough,” was Probber’s credo. A creative force in modern design, Probber also knew what would sell and never forgot the needs of his customers. A popularizer as well as an innovator, he never strayed too far into the realm of the theoretical, one reason his work did not always receive the acclaim it deserved.

 

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